Lead Like There’s Been An Accident

Have you ever noticed how emergency service providers – EMT’s, police, firefighters, doctors, lifeguards – don’t rush right into the scene of an accident? And have you ever considered why that is?

Think about what happens in our daily lives. We can get so bogged down by details and seeming urgencies that we lose sight of the landscape, and oftentimes the really important and critical matters that will make the largest impact to those we lead and serve.

This is the premise for responding to a scene of an accident. When the ambulance arrives, they don’t rush in and start reacting. They walk carefully into the heart of the scene to understand the incident and size up any potential danger. They don’t stop and treat the first injured person they see; instead they survey those injured and make note of the critical versus the minor injuries. From that, they can assess who needs the most urgent attention and can have a greater chance to save lives versus treating as they come across and missing a critical injury further down the scene.

This approach can serve our leadership influence well. A great leader will take these steps out of an emergency service providers’ playbook to be more effective in any matter:

  • Get to the heart of the matter. Don’t stand on the sidelines, but get in the trenches to understand the issue.
  • Don’t rush in. Take the time to delve into the situation, carefully observing all the variables and factors. Don’t prejudice your understanding before you truly know.
  • Remove danger. If there is a critical matter that will profoundly and adversely affect everyone, address it and remove the situation by resolving it. As EMT’s remove people from an exploding gas tank, leaders need to remove their people and organization from those volatile situations before they can treat the other issues at hand.
  • Triage. It’s easy to think you’re effective treating the first surface issue that comes across. yet you’re more effective and helpful when you see everyone involved and what the greatest and most urgent needs are.
  • Touch every affected person. People affected by even collateral damage in a situation need to be identified and treated as well. Make sure your approach is complete and everyone is accounted for.
  • Clean up. Once the scene is controlled and everyone is tended to, then create a clean up plan. Changes in systems, preventative measures, training, and perhaps noticing the signs that caused the incident will prevent future issues down the road.
  • Most important – STAY CALM. A doctor or lifeguard that panics or gets excitable or overly emotional will cause nothing but anxiety in those they are supposed to be helping. Calming down a situation involves keeping yourself calm in order to instill a sense of control and hope in others during these crisis.

Great leaders make this a deliberate habit in their lives. By understanding these steps, you can meet any situation and come to the rescue to make your organization and people safer, stronger, and more secure down the road.

Have a story or strategy along this thinking that works in these situations? Would love to hear your input!

(image: pixaby)

Book Review – “Customer Understanding” by Annette Franz

Annette Franz is founder and CEO of CX Journey Inc. She’s a respected voice in Customer Experience and Coaching, and has just published her new book “Customer Understanding: Three Ways to Put the ‘Customer’ in Customer Experience”.

The book is written to enable organizations and leaders within them to understand their customers and not pay lip-service. In addressing the either/or customer service versus product development (or any other initiatives we put first in our organization), she sets the framework from the very start to have leaders think about the customer in all aspects, and centrally, of their work. Products and services, in Annette’s words, are being commoditized, but customer experience should not.

Are you ready to put the “customer” in customer experience? In this new book, learn the three ways to do that – including instructions on how to properly execute the journey mapping process! #custexp #cx #customercentricity #journeymapping #voc #personas https://cx-journey.com/book

Annette break each chapter down very succinctly, which is great to digest in smaller pieces in today’s pace or work. But the most important thing she does in her work is giving great applications and resources to make the change real. Many books give theory with little application, and yet Franz packs a great amount of workable solutions into this book to help leaders assess, plan and implement the next steps on their customers journey.

Customer-centric businesses don’t happen by accident. In this new book, learn how to put the “customer” in customer experience – and at the heart of everything your business does! #customercentricity #custexp #cx #culture #leadership #customerunderstanding https://cx-journey.com/book

Annette’s writing is very conversational and easy to relate to. She speaks plainly but effectively, and you can easily see how she relates to common obstacles in organizations and guides you through them in her coaching style of writing.

#Customerunderstanding is the cornerstone of #customercentricity. In this new book, learn why and how to put the “customer” in customer experience – and at the heart of everything your business does! #custexp #cx #journeymapping #voc #personas https://cx-journey.com/book

A great book and practical to provide your customers with what they need to experience the journey of what your company brings to the table. I highly recommend it.

If interested, here’s the link below to get your copy:

#ThursdayThought – The Little Things Go Farther

The biggest task, most impactful initiative or largely brilliant strategy might seem like it has the biggest influence on your organization.

Any task, initiative or strategy has definitive goals, metrics and skills that drive them. In the end these “big things” become practices, procedures and policies.

Howver as more and more companies realize the neccessity of culture not only driving strategy, but being a strategy, it becomes imperative that the “little things” that drive culture go farther in driving stratgeic results.

A strong cadence of “do your job” can only go so far. If not coupled with the little things that strengthen and reinforce culture – such as simple acknowledgement, thank-yous and just connected conversations – people will not be refreshed or recharged to push further in your strategy.

Think of the marathon runner. 26.2 miles and many of them run that in just over 2 hours. Just determining to run and make that time is the task at hand, but runners and trainers know that can’t happen by sheer will.

That’s why there are people to hand cups of water to these athletes. If not for the small gesture of water, runners will be depleted of fluids which will eventually cause other problems, such as depleted oxygen, change in bloodflow and/or cramping and other maladies.

The little cup of water here and there over 26 miles may not seem like much, but the ability to provide a runner with just a few ounces of precious liquid makes a bigger impact than the determination of pace to cross the finish line.

Find the little things for your people. It goes farther than you think.

(image: pixabay)

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