Category Archives: Visionary Leadership

How To Treat Employee Engagement Like A Balance Scale

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Keeping employees engaged is similar to the process of using a balance scale.

On a balance scale, if you place weights more on one end than the other the scale will tip towards the heavier side. Employee engagement is very similar.

Envision the scale with two distinct balances on either side – one is engagement and one is disengagement. Each side has has a weight that can only be placed on one side – one weight is positive impact on your people (engagement), and the other is negative impact on them (disengagement).

Each organization has an employee engagement scale, but so does each team and each individual.

The overall goal of leadership is to weight the scale so heavily on the positive engagement side, with virtually no negative on the other balance. However the delicate nuance is to understand each individual’s scale and ensure their engagement side is properly weighted.

The challenge is to understand the principles of negativity and employee disconnect, and how any negative actions, including yours, are counted on the employee’s scale.

Negative impacts to your staff almost always outweigh the positive.

It takes a large amount of positive to offset negatives when they do occur.

Unlike weights on a physical scale which has constant density, employee engagement has variable weights based on the dynamics of the individuals and basic human principles of interaction. Consider the following variables:

  • Positives are lighter while negatives weigh more
  • Negatives can vary in weight from individual to individual 
  • More than one positive is needed to offset negatives
  • Small and seemingly normal positives may not outweigh negatives
  • Both weights have varying degrees of visibility – positives need to always be visible (public and tangible); negatives are usually invisible and hard to discern as many leaders are blinded to them
  • Negatives gain increasing weight over time (distrust grows) where smaller negatives can carry an enormous weight
  • Staff Appreciation Days, Thank You cards and Employee of the Month programs are good positives, but are too infrequent to offset constant year-round negatives

Some items that are heavier positives:

  • Sincere apologies
  • Concrete actions to correct poor leadership
  • Increased valuation of a person
  • More voice
  • Public praise and apology
  • Deferred leadership role, showing trust for your people to showcase their talents

While not an exhaustive list, these examples show the intricacies of how mindful leaders need to be in creating a culture of total engagement.

By gaining more awareness of the correlation of negative and positive weights that get placed on an employee engagement scale, you can create a better leadership style that puts more positive engagement weights and builds a deeper and more committed team in your organization.

(image: pixabay)

6 Uncommon Ways Leaders Need To Build Employee Trust and Commitment

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There have been myriads of articles and posts written about how leaders can best build commitment and a culture of trust among their employees. Many of those methods are proven and well-studied.

But one thing often missed is a need for leaders to drive deeper into themselves and promote a behavioral leadership style that fosters connection, commitment, and engagement.

Below are 6 behavior mindset changes that leaders need to change within themselves before they change the level of trust in their organization.

  • Trust Your People First. I had a business owner who was severely challenged with staffing tell me the reason she couldn’t get employees was that she didn’t trust anyone. She was shocked when I told her she was correct and wrong at the same time. Numbers of studies show how employees want trust from their leaders. Placing the trust in your people first will usually work to get them engaged – it never happens the other way around.
  • Don’t Play Favorites. Leaders who ignore others, such as spending most of their time with the coolest or the people making the numbers happen, divide their teams silently and quickly. When people feel detached because they aren’t part of the “inner circle” they distrust leadership and many think you have to be unethical in order to get attention or feel valued.
  • Don’t Assume Fault. Over the years I worked for a leader whose favorite response to any situation was “Who’s fault is that?” A question like this always placed people on the defensive, and assumed a failure on that person’s behalf. Moving away from a fault-finding mindset into a mindset of turning bad circumstances into opportunities to win long-term, change processes, or develop skills will have your people fighting for you when things go bad, instead of fleeing from you.
  • Know That They May Know More Than You. I had a former colleague say that they had been embarrassed about a boss showing them up by stating how little my friend knew in front of others and proceeded to talk about something they did not really know much about. My colleague told me the boss was actually the one who embarrassed themselves because everyone present saw the puffed-up leader make a fool of themselves. It did more to harm the trust of the staff as they felt they too would be next on the public embarrassment stage. Give your people the platform to showcase what they know and then stay out of their way to prove it.
  • Don’t Assume Ill Intent. Many times when an employee has an issue the first thing certain leaders do is to assume that the person isn’t committed, or going rogue, or being a saboteur. When leaders know that performance issues usually stem from lack of trust in leadership, systems, or culture, then you can take steps to correct those external forces that negatively impact employee performance. It’s another aspect of trust that needs to be present in mind at all times.
  • Find Ways To Always Train Them Up. Whether subtly or overtly, leaders who tear down staff in front of others will not produce leaders or employees who do the same in others. When a great leader focuses on every opportunity to train and develop, consistent with the other behaviors listed, a culture of trust is solidified in which true business growth can then foster. By finding ways to train instead of criticize, people around you will adopt a development mindset that attracts employees and brings out their best for you.

Over the years I have noticed that the best leaders consistently exhibit all of these traits without wavering. Those that have swung on both ends of the spectrum in any of these behaviors showed a much higher degree of employee mistrust.

Changing the level of commitment from employees means changing the level of trust first. This can only be done by changing your leadership mindset in how you approach and view any and all of your people to begin with.

(image: pixabay)

How Organizations Need To Confirm Humanity

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Have you ever had to click on the above image? You know, those automated boxes that prevent “bots” from spamming their site whenever you make a purchase, download a file, or subscribe to their email newsletter.

It helps to allow the digital experience to qualify better organization-to-consumer relationships and minimize organization-to-automation drain on their resources.

This “Confirm Humanity” process is quite necessary today, but what is more necessary in today’s world is the need to actually confirm humanity when it comes to customer service in the digital realm.

A recent study on customer service showed that it is the new battlefield of differentiation for marketing, yet it will be spread across multiple platforms to reach customers. The challenge with the multi-channel service is that between online, mobile and social media portals is that there is huge challenge to confirm humanity at every interaction.

It’s not enough to deliver a digital experience across several channels but to ensure that each customer feels there is both a human experience and human connection.

The anti-bot checkbox helps confirm humanity to the company, but how is your company confirming humanity to your customers?

Just because a channel is hosted online does not mean there cannot be a human experience behind it. Many ways to confirm humanity exist on those digital channels such as:

  • Video introduction, interaction, of confirmation of subscription or purchase
  • Having an intuitive design for customer experience
  • Creating a Zappos-like instant chat or call center culture
  • Showing politeness and thankfulness on confirmation screens, pop-ups, and weekly newsletters (versus the standard “Thank you for your order.”
  • Ensure the end-user experience is smooth, intuitive, stable and built with the customer, not the company, foremost in mind
  • Use psychology and behavior patterns to be more intune to your customers tendencies, needs and expectations
  • Personalize their service using smart AI and allow the customer to personalize their experience as well
  • Humanize your brand image – even the most tech and industrial companies do this such as Rackspace
  • Get your customers to be engaged through your channels, whether building raving fans or deeper community online

There are myriads of ways to confirm the humanity of your company to your customers. While customers continue to gravitate to online channels, they are still people who want to be valued as people on the other end of the transaction. making your digital experience a great customer experience by infusing more humanity will determine your success in this area.

Oh, and one more very important thing. Make sure everyone in your organization confirms humanity by displaying care and great service attitudes as well. Most companies are still sorely lacking in this area. No matter how many multi-channel services you offer, the interpersonal customer experience is always about people, and starts and stops here.

 

 

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