Category Archives: Visionary Leadership

The Perils Of Chasing Rabbits

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Does your company go chasing rabbits every now and then?

Chasing rabbits is when any thought or action disrupts what is relevant and takes people off tangent of the current course.

For example, an email can cause a ripple effect through a department when people jump to conclusions or immediately respond to the “urgency” of the subject or discussion, causing people minutes to hours of disrupted work.

 

When a company chases a rabbit without intent, such as the above example, it can create unintended consequences in stopping the flow of work. But if done intentionally, it has far more damaging effects.

I was involved in the leadership team of an organization that met weekly. The chief executive would strategically take a conversation off course by throwing out a thought that the rest of the team would pounce on and discuss quite fervently. We soon discovered that when certain issues were brought up that could shed light on some of their improprieties, they would throw us off and down a rabbit trail in hopes that we’d get distracted. It worked for a time but when it finally caught up to them, we had gone far off our mission and realized the wasted time and resources that were affected by their behavior.

It’s easy to go down a rabbit trail – knee-jerk responses, emotional ploys, fear, anger, bringing others in that bog down the disruption, and playing off assumptions and urgencies that don’t exist.

 

In order to prevent your team from going down the rabbit trail, ensure your team:

A team that has enough people that is grounded in the main tenets of their culture will protect themselves from both intentional and unintentional rabbit trails that come their way.

(image: flickr)

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Leadership Lessons From Board Game Mechanics

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A few years ago the term “gamification” briefly became the vogue trend in business, much of which still exists today in certain manifestations. This was the application of game elements, mostly videogames, into processes to increase engagement, flow, or end-user experience.

As with any new development in new business models and techniques, this approach was both met with success and also mis-applied. Many that made gamificaiton work had infused fun and achievement into their workplace. Others that failed either mis-appropriated the principles or the fit was night right for their culture or business model.

However there is an effective way to incorporate game elements into your business and organization – by using the basic mechanics from board games.

The board game industry may seem like a trivial amusement fad, yet the mathematical processes and strategies that go into design and game play have served this industry well – to the tune of $9.4-9.6 billion of revenues worldwide.

Because of this, we can draw some ideas from their mechanics and find ways to apply them to making our organizations better.

  • Social interaction. Board games are hugely popular because they are social by nature. Bringing people together in friendly competition or joint cooperative fun has always caused people to connect at a high level, Creating more fun and engaging social interaction will enable your team to compete and collaborate more effectively and without barriers.
  • Minimize randomness. The Eurogame industry which fueled the board game boom in the late 1990s created games such as Puerto Rico or Agricola that were highly dependent on using items other than dice. This minimized the chance randomness and led to a more smooth and balanced gameplay. Companies can minimize randomness by discerning certain risks, constructing a smooth workflow, and designing better processes by beta testing to ensure minimal variables can disrupt the system when things are in motion.
  • Worker placement &┬áresource management. As the game Settlers of Catan showcased, these are two popular mechanics that allow people to place their pawns on the board to access areas to their advantage, and to manage the limited resources available to all players to make the most strategic use of what can be gained. An organization that knows where to place their people effectively, and can create solid products and services from limited resources (or superb products and services from abundant resources should they have them) is showing they care not to waste these precious commodities and will consistently have higher returns for their efforts than the average organization.
  • Build your engine. In some games, the player needs to acquire cards, money, spaces, and other items in order to generate more cards, spaces and money in return. The classic game of Monopoly highlights this effect. Good companies know that to generate resources and money in smaller efforts that will generate even greater returns on these items more and more as time goes on is an effective means to a great ROI.
  • Cooperative experience. Not all games pit players against each other. Some games, like party games or the game Pandemic or Flash Point, will pit players to team up against the game itself to save the world from a plague or a house from burning down. And not all business has to have a one winner condition. Building teamwork, team goals, and team success and developing their skills and talents in ways that individual goals could never do. And even if the team does not achieve it’s goal, the by-product of learning from others and building a stronger culture within a groups will reap long-term dividends.
  • Replayability. Some games are good a few times, then become old quickly. The best games have variety built-in, never being the same twice, and always leave room for new scenarios and outcomes to occur. A successful company likewise shouldn’t be a one-trick pony – having a verity of solid people, goods, and services that can provide more to your customers is essential. Even if your organization specialize in a small niche, there is a wide array of service that can support that product, and people that can provide those services. Diversify within your model so your customers won’t get bored and shelf you for something more fun and exciting down the road.

Finding new ways to generate innovative processes and goals for your organization is what every leader works towards. Leadership principles can be found in every place if you look for them. Even in our digital age we can be inspired by bits of cardboard to teach us how to get better.

(image: theguardian)

 

Hire People Who Challenge You

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Have you ever noticed that quite often leaders don’t promote many of their staff?

That’s because the default method of many average leaders is to hire people who are on a “lower level” than themselves.

I have worked with individual leaders who have hired non-degreed professional help, those with “basic intelligence”, “good followers” and people who are of lower self-esteem on purpose. Those justifications are below:

  • The leader wants to be in complete charge
  • They never want to be questioned
  • Or held accountable
  • She or he want to be the smartest person in the room
  • They like having a paternal/maternal reputation
  • He or she believe they can bully, fool or manipulate their subordinates

However the fact is, that surrounding yourself with people in any capacity that don’t challenge you only makes you grow weaker. When you associate with people who don’t sharpen your skills, the tendency is to not be sharpened yourself. In any realm, that means you grow dull and regress.

The most astute leaders know that hiring people who can be smarter, more energetic, more tech-savvy, or with better charisma doesn’t just compensate for what they don;t fully possess as a skill, and will not only complement what the hiring leader has, but will actually help them learn and play up to the heightened skill set that gets brought on board.

Hiring better people than yourself should not be feared, but fully embraced. I have yet to witness a sharp leader who has hired sharper people and then found themselves out of a position. In fact, the reason they hired individuals who challenged them actually cemented the role that they had in the first place, because the key to being a great leader was displayed – seek and hire great talent.

Purpose to seek and hire talent better than yourself. It not only build the team, but makes things easier for everyone in the organization. You can only benefit from it.

(image: pixaby)

 

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