Category Archives: Personal Development

Why Slow Learners May Be Ready For Rapid Growth

bamboo-forest-1245966_1280

In virtually every organization there are people who seem to never learn or grow. Oftentimes we classify them as disengaged, subversive, or troublemakers, and look to dismiss them.

I have observed repeatedly a fair number of people that have slow learning curves which takes them a while to learn the fundamentals of their job. Yet I have been amazed at how many have blossomed over a longer period of time than others into solid team members and even became strong leaders in their own right.

What was the cause for the transformation?

Many people grow in proportion like a bamboo tree.

When a bamboo tree is planted and watered it doesn’t sprout for the first year, or the second. Or the third. Or the fourth. It takes five full years for the typical bamboo plant to finally break ground.

Once it does, it is actually one of the fastest growing plants in the world, sometimes growing at a rate of 35 inches in a day.

What is the cause for this tremendous growth?

In the course of the four-year period of seeming nothingness, the tree is growing a complex underground network of roots. These roots are so vast and extensive, that if you were to uproot a grown tree you would find it difficult to do so because of the root system.

It’s roots store all that water and nutrients, and create a myriad of conduits to support the rapid growth of the tree when it’s time has come.

And when the tree has come to full maturity, it possesses a denser strength than brick or concrete and a higher tensile strength than steel.

Sit back and think of the people in your organization that don’t seem to be growing. Are they working hard? Listening? Are they staying loyal, staying put with your company?

These people might actually be growing under the surface in ways you may not notice. These could be future impact players who, with the right combination of water and nutrients – training, encouragement, and entrusted responsibility – could shoot up from their place and make their presence known.

Just because we don’t see anything happening on the outside – stellar performance, heads nodding in agreement, skills being mastered in our timeframe – does not mean your people are not learning and growing. They may very well be developing some strong roots underneath.

Every leader is responsible for giving their people the necessary ingredients for growth and development. If you withhold any ingredient, you stunt their growth. When you liberally apply training, vision, knowledge, trust, and other internal and external resources, you may see quick growth. But if you don’t see anything quickly, be patient and wait. They are growing, you just may not actually see it.

Invest your time into everybody. Don’t be prejudiced by the outward displays of growth and performance. You just might discover some people ripe for rapid growth.

People that will be strong as steel – or a bamboo tree – in their value and loyalty to your organization.

(image: pixabay)

#ThursdayThoughts – Take Time To Think

woman-2003647_1280

Do you know what the most powerful strategy is to help your professional personal strategy be more effective?

To be more successful – Take five minutes out of your day to stop and simply think.

Work and life can get incredibly busy and stressful and sometimes the amount of information and activity clouds are ability to process what we’re doing and where we’re going.

By taking five minutes in the middle of every day or at the end of every day stop all activity and distractions and simply think.

Thinking can take many forms – pondering, meditating, writing, drawing – any form to sort or organize, or just to stop and assess where you’re at during the moment – are all profitable ways to allow your brain to gather itself and recharge.

Going to the break room, hiding in your car, or finding some other private place – as well as silencing your cell phone or leaving it at your desk – will I do this precious time for your brain to relax and for you to organize your thoughts and emotions.

The ROI in making this a habit will be exponential in your ability to control the outcome of your days. Your will be sharper, have less stress, and find yourself back in control.

(image: pixabay)

6 Leader Styles That Personify Servant Leadership

adventure-1807524_1280

Look at the list of professional roles below and see if you can find a leadership trait that each has in common with the rest:

  • Circus Ringmaster
  • Symphony Conductor
  • School Teacher
  • Healthcare Professional (Nurse, Doctor, Specialist, Weight Loss Coach)
  • Pastor
  • Law Officer

What these roles have in common is their sole purpose is to bring out the best in those they interface with, without glory for themselves. This commonality is the core of their leadership, and anyone else’s as well.

Each of these roles function is to make those around them better, while working hard to perfect their calling. They may be the focal point at first glance, but careful discernment shows the prefer others to be focused on instead.

Let’s look quickly at how each one does this and what we can learn from their approach.

Circus Ringmaster. You may think this person is the center stage attraction. Every act they have the spotlight, and their showmanship and persona gain the attention of everyone in the audience. But their core job is to build up excitement and anticipation for the main acts and to slip behind the curtain away from the spotlight to allow the performers to showcase their talents. Great leaders promote their people and never stand in the way of their ability to “Wow” their customers.

Symphony Conductor.  It takes years of study to attain to this level of musical mastery, yet the conductor is only 1 of 50, 100 or more people working together. They may be a headliner to a degree (such as Arthur Fiedler) but usually perform with their back towards their audience, having the musicians face the crowd. Their job is to get the best performance of each musician, each section, and create a culture of teamwork and professionalism to give a peak performance, over and over, each night.

School Teacher. To have the power to effect young and impressionable minds of the future should not be a task taken lightly. Teachers are charged with creating foundations for academics, model citizens, and fostering behaviors to mold the next generation of (all-too-soon-to-be) adults. To balance teaching core principles, truth, critical thinking, and mutual respect as well as keeping their students engaged and motivated daily are similar to what many leaders face every day. That all with the focus of getting children to learn and believe in their talents as they are just starting to discover them.

Healthcare Professional. The roles of these women and men may work more on the physical needs, but they work on the mental and emotional needs of those that depend on them. Their goal is a simple one – to make people better, healthier – by their skills and also through education, compassion, and sacrificing themselves. Many of these women and men work long hours to save a life, often putting themselves at risk. A great leader serves others in spite of the inherent danger they may face themselves, without recognition many times. (When a patient heals, it’s almost always said they made a great recovery and rarely does the credit go the to nurse or doctor).

Pastor. A pastor’s true calling is not to build a big mega-church, write best sellers, make people feel better, or have a large video audience. Theirs is a simple yet difficult calling – to faithfully teach the Scriptures to their congregation and help them towards spiritual maturity. Handled properly they can help positively impact many lives; but an incorrect misuse of the text or their office can leave lives, families, and whole communities in shambles. Pastors devote themselves to careful study, long hours, of prayer and ministry, and forego the comforts of their home lifestyle to meet the needs of others in their homes, the hospital, or wherever the need occurs. They grieve when people falter, and are patient and long-suffering to see folks grow slowly over years and decades. They are the true servant leaders who serve others to help them grow spiritually.

Law Officer. While this role may seem out of sorts juxtaposed on this list, their position is a unique one, especially those with integrity. They swear an oath to protect and to serve others, through both enforcing the law and keeping the order and safety of the citizens in their city or town. They serve through all elements (no bad weather days) and oftentimes volunteer to put their bodies and lives at risk to ensure the welfare of others. They personify servant leadership by placing their own well being to the limits in order to ensure citizens have freedom and peace form those who oppose it.

Virtually all of these servant leader roles are thankless jobs; others get the attention and recognition when things go right, and they take all of the blame when things go wrong. Yet true servant leadership is not worried about where the credit goes, they simply want others to do better as a result of their talents and skills and position.

Consider how your own role can model a better servant leader influence. Take some guidance from these noble positions and incorporate their passion into serving others.

(image: pixaby)

%d bloggers like this: