Category Archives: People Development

#ThursdayThought – Business Is People

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In our automated, tech, and email driven workplace, it’s hard to think that business is about people. But consider these thoughts:

  • You don’t conduct business (B2B or B2C) with companies, but with people you trust.
  • The very first business exchanges centuries ago, before technology and systems, revolved around people first.
  • In every transaction, there is at least two people that are affected.
  • In your efforts to move up and become wealthy, there are people that share in your success and depend on you to help them succeed as well.
  • Acquiring the world means nothing if people are not there to support you. Acquiring people to support you means everything even if you do not have the world at your disposal.
  • Don’t lose who you are as a person for things that are temporary.
  • Every industry has one common denominator – people. The systems, business models, technologies, and products or services differ company to company. 
  • Profits are temporary. People are permanent.

If we kept in mind that every action we conduct in our business has the opportunity to impact other people – for good or for ill – we could make a positive and transformative impact in our sphere of influence. So keep in mind

Business Is People

(image: canva/pixabay)

Experts Don’t Need Letters After Their Name

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Over the weekend I came across a series of content by a leadership author who heavily discounted what they would proclaim as so-called leadership experts.

As I mulled over their claims, I realized how many people in higher levels of leadership discredit others because their credentials don’t seem to be to their standards.

Let’s calibrate our understanding of what experts are:

  • a person having a high level of knowledge or skill in a particular subject (Cambridge Dictionary)
  • having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

We should also review the definition of a leader:

  • a person who manages or controls other people, esp. because of his or her ability or position (Cambridge)
  • a person who leads (Merriam-Webster)

It is essential here to point out that in none of these definitions (or others) is there a criteria for PhD’s, MBA’s, being on a board of directors, authoring books, teaching at universities or needing any other qualifying experience or education.

Unfortunately people who look down on others in this fashion tend to do so from an aura of superiority, resting on their own laurels. Experientially these people tend to be the least teachable and most difficult to create an engaged team that will trust and rally around them. They place themselves in a position of higher criticism and use their sole judgement to assess who is worthy of credibility.

And what these folks do is exhibit the same poor leadership behaviors that they denounce in their content. They place roadblocks into building another person up or giving them a platform for voice and value in what they know.

Here are some real-life situations in which someone has discounted another’s opinion because it didn’t meet the person’s prejudices:

Leaders and experts don’t need to have letters behind their name or have high-level positions.

As I have mentioned before, teenagers and the person you meet in everyday life can be effective leaders. All someone needs to be an expert is experience and the application through study and practice of their daily sphere.

The greatest experts in the field of leadership will tell you lifting others up, giving them value and a voice, and offering them a platform to showcase their talents is what true leadership is about.

Being an expert and leader is more than just letters after a name. It’s about the application of real-life principles to teach, lead and positively influence your sphere.

(image: flickr)

 

 

Why You Need To Be Self-Aware AND Others-Aware

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Self-Awareness has been a vital part of leadership for a handful of years. But being self-aware is not enough.

Great leaders need to focus on being “Others-Aware”.

Leaders do not operate in a vacuum, and cannot lead without the collective efforts and vision of others. But to focus on one’s self exclusively will lead to a shallowness of understanding and influence that will be ineffective and wear yourself out.

Here are some reasons and key benefits to being a leader who is “others-aware”:

  1. Understanding the concept that business is people. Google “business is people” and you’ll see the concept exposited from Richard Branson, Forbes magazine, Brian Tracy, Harvard Business Review, and others. This philosophy of success is based on meeting the needs of the organizations teams and individuals. When you realize the value of bringing others along for the journey, you start to become aware of their needs as both colleagues, business partners, and customers.
  2. Don’t focus too much on self. By focusing solely on self, you will obsess about everything you are working on and exclude those around you. This isolationist mindset will cause you to detach from the big picture of what is going on around you. By focusing on others, you not only become more aware of their needs, but also realize more of what you need to work on yourself in the process.
  3. You are only one piece of the team. If a conductor of an orchestra stepped to the platform to perform without the ensemble, they would be ineffective and a failure. They need the entire orchestra to complement their abilities and bring harmony together. Likewise, as a leader you need your teams and cannot achieve the mission without them. Bringing their talents to the forefront and making them the star of the show delivers results that cannot be met in any one person’s power.
  4. Connecting with people. Being aware of others means to connect others to others, sometimes even without yourself, to allow a team to flourish, innovate, and syngergize. A leader focused on self will get in the way of their people’s interactions. Instead, know what your team’s needs are from within itself and foster those working relationships from within to build connection and culture.
  5. Knowing the needs to the individual, and the whole team. If as a leader you fall short of meeting your people’s basic needs, they will pull away, causing toxicity, less production, and even some sabotage of the organization in various levels. Employees whose needs are met will grow, give more of themselves, and know that their workplace cares for their personal and career lives.
  6. Strengthening and building current and subsequent leaders. If you think other people will follow you solely on your example, you are missing the point. Future leaders are great followers, but all followers follow only those that invest in them. If you want to develop better employees and future leaders, know what they need, commit and invest in building their skills to attain those abilities.
  7. Creating a deeper engagement. Sometimes leaders will focus on employee engagement, but from such an internal aspect they fail to grasp the concept and bring full committed engagement about. Engaged employees are only engaged so long as they feel they are being taken care of; they are totally committed when they know their best interests are being looked after. Drill down engagement to deeper roots by focusing on others and being aware of their needs at any given time.

If you are a leader who is being self-aware…keep it up and keep growing. Yet remind yourself to be “others-aware: and engage in their future. Bring as many people along the way to attaining the goals set before you. You’ll be amazed at how they will grow, and how you grow as well.

Make the commitment to be “Others-Aware” and work on your interactions with the people in your sphere of influence!

(image: pixabay)

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