Category Archives: Visionary Leadership

#ThursdayThought – “Who Else Does This” Doesn’t Work

Never go anywhere waiting

Why do people and organizations ask as a reflexive action “Well, who else does this?” when they hear about a product or service for the first time.

It’s because they want to leverage someone else’s courage, and more often the case their other’s money, so they don’t take on unknown risk.

But many people don’t generally think that … someone had to be the first mover.

While First-Movers and Early-Adopters don’t always succeed because of their willingness to blaze a trail, they do something most other companies don’t do – they show courage to test new waters, adopt new technology, or forego industry norms to differentiate.

So many times companies, especially established ones, play defense by asking “who else does this?” instead of playing offense in bucking a trend and disrupting the marketplace.

You’ll never go anywhere waiting for others to go before you.

Worst case scenario – it doesn’t work and you go back to the core.

Best case scenario – you grow your market share, increase sales, and/or be noted as a pioneer in your industry.

If it sounds good to consider, don’t continue to ask. Just go for it.

(image: pixabay/canva)

 

 

Experts Don’t Need Letters After Their Name

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Over the weekend I came across a series of content by a leadership author who heavily discounted what they would proclaim as so-called leadership experts.

As I mulled over their claims, I realized how many people in higher levels of leadership discredit others because their credentials don’t seem to be to their standards.

Let’s calibrate our understanding of what experts are:

  • a person having a high level of knowledge or skill in a particular subject (Cambridge Dictionary)
  • having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

We should also review the definition of a leader:

  • a person who manages or controls other people, esp. because of his or her ability or position (Cambridge)
  • a person who leads (Merriam-Webster)

It is essential here to point out that in none of these definitions (or others) is there a criteria for PhD’s, MBA’s, being on a board of directors, authoring books, teaching at universities or needing any other qualifying experience or education.

Unfortunately people who look down on others in this fashion tend to do so from an aura of superiority, resting on their own laurels. Experientially these people tend to be the least teachable and most difficult to create an engaged team that will trust and rally around them. They place themselves in a position of higher criticism and use their sole judgement to assess who is worthy of credibility.

And what these folks do is exhibit the same poor leadership behaviors that they denounce in their content. They place roadblocks into building another person up or giving them a platform for voice and value in what they know.

Here are some real-life situations in which someone has discounted another’s opinion because it didn’t meet the person’s prejudices:

Leaders and experts don’t need to have letters behind their name or have high-level positions.

As I have mentioned before, teenagers and the person you meet in everyday life can be effective leaders. All someone needs to be an expert is experience and the application through study and practice of their daily sphere.

The greatest experts in the field of leadership will tell you lifting others up, giving them value and a voice, and offering them a platform to showcase their talents is what true leadership is about.

Being an expert and leader is more than just letters after a name. It’s about the application of real-life principles to teach, lead and positively influence your sphere.

(image: flickr)

 

 

How To Treat Employee Engagement Like A Balance Scale

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Keeping employees engaged is similar to the process of using a balance scale.

On a balance scale, if you place weights more on one end than the other the scale will tip towards the heavier side. Employee engagement is very similar.

Envision the scale with two distinct balances on either side – one is engagement and one is disengagement. Each side has has a weight that can only be placed on one side – one weight is positive impact on your people (engagement), and the other is negative impact on them (disengagement).

Each organization has an employee engagement scale, but so does each team and each individual.

The overall goal of leadership is to weight the scale so heavily on the positive engagement side, with virtually no negative on the other balance. However the delicate nuance is to understand each individual’s scale and ensure their engagement side is properly weighted.

The challenge is to understand the principles of negativity and employee disconnect, and how any negative actions, including yours, are counted on the employee’s scale.

Negative impacts to your staff almost always outweigh the positive.

It takes a large amount of positive to offset negatives when they do occur.

Unlike weights on a physical scale which has constant density, employee engagement has variable weights based on the dynamics of the individuals and basic human principles of interaction. Consider the following variables:

  • Positives are lighter while negatives weigh more
  • Negatives can vary in weight from individual to individual 
  • More than one positive is needed to offset negatives
  • Small and seemingly normal positives may not outweigh negatives
  • Both weights have varying degrees of visibility – positives need to always be visible (public and tangible); negatives are usually invisible and hard to discern as many leaders are blinded to them
  • Negatives gain increasing weight over time (distrust grows) where smaller negatives can carry an enormous weight
  • Staff Appreciation Days, Thank You cards and Employee of the Month programs are good positives, but are too infrequent to offset constant year-round negatives

Some items that are heavier positives:

  • Sincere apologies
  • Concrete actions to correct poor leadership
  • Increased valuation of a person
  • More voice
  • Public praise and apology
  • Deferred leadership role, showing trust for your people to showcase their talents

While not an exhaustive list, these examples show the intricacies of how mindful leaders need to be in creating a culture of total engagement.

By gaining more awareness of the correlation of negative and positive weights that get placed on an employee engagement scale, you can create a better leadership style that puts more positive engagement weights and builds a deeper and more committed team in your organization.

(image: pixabay)

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