Category Archives: Connection & Engagement

#ThursdayThought – Business Is People

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In our automated, tech, and email driven workplace, it’s hard to think that business is about people. But consider these thoughts:

  • You don’t conduct business (B2B or B2C) with companies, but with people you trust.
  • The very first business exchanges centuries ago, before technology and systems, revolved around people first.
  • In every transaction, there is at least two people that are affected.
  • In your efforts to move up and become wealthy, there are people that share in your success and depend on you to help them succeed as well.
  • Acquiring the world means nothing if people are not there to support you. Acquiring people to support you means everything even if you do not have the world at your disposal.
  • Don’t lose who you are as a person for things that are temporary.
  • Every industry has one common denominator – people. The systems, business models, technologies, and products or services differ company to company. 
  • Profits are temporary. People are permanent.

If we kept in mind that every action we conduct in our business has the opportunity to impact other people – for good or for ill – we could make a positive and transformative impact in our sphere of influence. So keep in mind

Business Is People

(image: canva/pixabay)

Experts Don’t Need Letters After Their Name

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Over the weekend I came across a series of content by a leadership author who heavily discounted what they would proclaim as so-called leadership experts.

As I mulled over their claims, I realized how many people in higher levels of leadership discredit others because their credentials don’t seem to be to their standards.

Let’s calibrate our understanding of what experts are:

  • a person having a high level of knowledge or skill in a particular subject (Cambridge Dictionary)
  • having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

We should also review the definition of a leader:

  • a person who manages or controls other people, esp. because of his or her ability or position (Cambridge)
  • a person who leads (Merriam-Webster)

It is essential here to point out that in none of these definitions (or others) is there a criteria for PhD’s, MBA’s, being on a board of directors, authoring books, teaching at universities or needing any other qualifying experience or education.

Unfortunately people who look down on others in this fashion tend to do so from an aura of superiority, resting on their own laurels. Experientially these people tend to be the least teachable and most difficult to create an engaged team that will trust and rally around them. They place themselves in a position of higher criticism and use their sole judgement to assess who is worthy of credibility.

And what these folks do is exhibit the same poor leadership behaviors that they denounce in their content. They place roadblocks into building another person up or giving them a platform for voice and value in what they know.

Here are some real-life situations in which someone has discounted another’s opinion because it didn’t meet the person’s prejudices:

Leaders and experts don’t need to have letters behind their name or have high-level positions.

As I have mentioned before, teenagers and the person you meet in everyday life can be effective leaders. All someone needs to be an expert is experience and the application through study and practice of their daily sphere.

The greatest experts in the field of leadership will tell you lifting others up, giving them value and a voice, and offering them a platform to showcase their talents is what true leadership is about.

Being an expert and leader is more than just letters after a name. It’s about the application of real-life principles to teach, lead and positively influence your sphere.

(image: flickr)

 

 

#ThursdayThought – How Your Words Build Or Tear Down

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The power of the spoken word is immense.

It has the ability to inspire, motivate and lead others to an amazing effect. It also has the ability to humiliate destroy and the more allies a person is value and self-worth.

Words can build up or tear down, the choice is yours.

Because most of our communication – whether it is spoken, transcribed or digital – we need to be cognizant of its impact on other people. It’s easy to point fingers at other people‘s words but it needs to start with each of us individually and how we can edify (or detract from) another person’s value.

Be mindful of our words that criticize, embellish, are colorful and unprofessional, that are used to elevate yourself above someone else. We may do this under the guise of telling it straight but in reality it can cause divisiveness, disengagement and loss of credible influence.

While we all want to be honest in our communication, great leaders and great people know how to balance the any conversation with an overwhelming desire to use words that build, restore, inspire, encourage and create a positive impact on those they are intended, and not intended, for.

Use your words wisely.

 (image: pixabay/canva)

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