Author Archives: Paul LaRue

Why Slow Learners May Be Ready For Rapid Growth

bamboo-forest-1245966_1280

In virtually every organization there are people who seem to never learn or grow. Oftentimes we classify them as disengaged, subversive, or troublemakers, and look to dismiss them.

I have observed repeatedly a fair number of people that have slow learning curves which takes them a while to learn the fundamentals of their job. Yet I have been amazed at how many have blossomed over a longer period of time than others into solid team members and even became strong leaders in their own right.

What was the cause for the transformation?

Many people grow in proportion like a bamboo tree.

When a bamboo tree is planted and watered it doesn’t sprout for the first year, or the second. Or the third. Or the fourth. It takes five full years for the typical bamboo plant to finally break ground.

Once it does, it is actually one of the fastest growing plants in the world, sometimes growing at a rate of 35 inches in a day.

What is the cause for this tremendous growth?

In the course of the four-year period of seeming nothingness, the tree is growing a complex underground network of roots. These roots are so vast and extensive, that if you were to uproot a grown tree you would find it difficult to do so because of the root system.

It’s roots store all that water and nutrients, and create a myriad of conduits to support the rapid growth of the tree when it’s time has come.

And when the tree has come to full maturity, it possesses a denser strength than brick or concrete and a higher tensile strength than steel.

Sit back and think of the people in your organization that don’t seem to be growing. Are they working hard? Listening? Are they staying loyal, staying put with your company?

These people might actually be growing under the surface in ways you may not notice. These could be future impact players who, with the right combination of water and nutrients – training, encouragement, and entrusted responsibility – could shoot up from their place and make their presence known.

Just because we don’t see anything happening on the outside – stellar performance, heads nodding in agreement, skills being mastered in our timeframe – does not mean your people are not learning and growing. They may very well be developing some strong roots underneath.

Every leader is responsible for giving their people the necessary ingredients for growth and development. If you withhold any ingredient, you stunt their growth. When you liberally apply training, vision, knowledge, trust, and other internal and external resources, you may see quick growth. But if you don’t see anything quickly, be patient and wait. They are growing, you just may not actually see it.

Invest your time into everybody. Don’t be prejudiced by the outward displays of growth and performance. You just might discover some people ripe for rapid growth.

People that will be strong as steel – or a bamboo tree – in their value and loyalty to your organization.

(image: pixabay)

#ThursdayThoughts – Take Time To Think

woman-2003647_1280

Do you know what the most powerful strategy is to help your professional personal strategy be more effective?

To be more successful – Take five minutes out of your day to stop and simply think.

Work and life can get incredibly busy and stressful and sometimes the amount of information and activity clouds are ability to process what we’re doing and where we’re going.

By taking five minutes in the middle of every day or at the end of every day stop all activity and distractions and simply think.

Thinking can take many forms – pondering, meditating, writing, drawing – any form to sort or organize, or just to stop and assess where you’re at during the moment – are all profitable ways to allow your brain to gather itself and recharge.

Going to the break room, hiding in your car, or finding some other private place – as well as silencing your cell phone or leaving it at your desk – will I do this precious time for your brain to relax and for you to organize your thoughts and emotions.

The ROI in making this a habit will be exponential in your ability to control the outcome of your days. Your will be sharper, have less stress, and find yourself back in control.

(image: pixabay)

How Open Book Leadership Builds Trust

person-731479_1280

Some time ago I conducted a training session for a number of restaurant employees. I prefaced my training session with an explanation of how restaurants made money, and that the average restaurant makes about a 5% profit.

As soon as this fact rolled from my mouth, a number of servers who were present with their owner turned to her and questioned “Is that right?” The owner nodded and confirmed “Some months, yes.”

The staff then turned around to me and many of them exclaimed, “Well, we’ll need to help Cathy make more money then.” The sense of teamwork to rally and help their boss make her business more profitable was the most incredible aspect of that training.

Usually in consulting with business owners, I find that most of them never share the financials with their employees.

The usual excuses abound:

“They don’t need to know.”

“I can’t trust them, why should I show them the books?”

“It’s not their job to know.”

“We can’t show them what we really make.”

“They’ll want a raise!!”

Then there are always the unspoken excuses that being open-book will reveal issues, such as impropriety, false reporting, bleaker financial pictures, and so on.

Business owners and leaders who want to increase engagement can easily develop trust by adopting an open-book culture that lets employees know the financials, a more connected and positive workplace results. This study from the University of Michigan underscores some of the benefits of this approach.

Here are some of the other benefits of adopting an open-book culture:

  • It give employees information to make informed decisions
  • It builds trust in all directions of the organization
  • It enables people to make decisions to better increase bottom line, without being told so
  • It gives employees a better understanding of how strategy and goals are, or are not, meeting financial goals
  • It holds leadership and the entire organization accountable for financial stewardship
  • It indirectly asks people to give input on ways to help make revenue, and save on costs
  • It gives people a deeper insight as to your industry so they can develop their knowledge more thoroughly
  • It also builds more experts in your industry and deepens your organization’s competency and acumen

While it’s clear there are so many advantages for open book leadership, there is one disadvantage however – holding unethical leadership accountable. The case is pretty clear, if you want people to open up and engage, you will need to open up your books first.

(image: pixabay)

%d bloggers like this: