How To Treat Employee Engagement Like A Balance Scale

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Keeping employees engaged is similar to the process of using a balance scale.

On a balance scale, if you place weights more on one end than the other the scale will tip towards the heavier side. Employee engagement is very similar.

Envision the scale with two distinct balances on either side – one is engagement and one is disengagement. Each side has has a weight that can only be placed on one side – one weight is positive impact on your people (engagement), and the other is negative impact on them (disengagement).

Each organization has an employee engagement scale, but so does each team and each individual.

The overall goal of leadership is to weight the scale so heavily on the positive engagement side, with virtually no negative on the other balance. However the delicate nuance is to understand each individual’s scale and ensure their engagement side is properly weighted.

The challenge is to understand the principles of negativity and employee disconnect, and how any negative actions, including yours, are counted on the employee’s scale.

Negative impacts to your staff almost always outweigh the positive.

It takes a large amount of positive to offset negatives when they do occur.

Unlike weights on a physical scale which has constant density, employee engagement has variable weights based on the dynamics of the individuals and basic human principles of interaction. Consider the following variables:

  • Positives are lighter while negatives weigh more
  • Negatives can vary in weight from individual to individual 
  • More than one positive is needed to offset negatives
  • Small and seemingly normal positives may not outweigh negatives
  • Both weights have varying degrees of visibility – positives need to always be visible (public and tangible); negatives are usually invisible and hard to discern as many leaders are blinded to them
  • Negatives gain increasing weight over time (distrust grows) where smaller negatives can carry an enormous weight
  • Staff Appreciation Days, Thank You cards and Employee of the Month programs are good positives, but are too infrequent to offset constant year-round negatives

Some items that are heavier positives:

  • Sincere apologies
  • Concrete actions to correct poor leadership
  • Increased valuation of a person
  • More voice
  • Public praise and apology
  • Deferred leadership role, showing trust for your people to showcase their talents

While not an exhaustive list, these examples show the intricacies of how mindful leaders need to be in creating a culture of total engagement.

By gaining more awareness of the correlation of negative and positive weights that get placed on an employee engagement scale, you can create a better leadership style that puts more positive engagement weights and builds a deeper and more committed team in your organization.

(image: pixabay)

About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on September.24.2018, in Connection & Engagement, Culture, Leadership, Leadership Strategies, Team Development, Values, Visionary Leadership. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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