6 Uncommon Ways Leaders Need To Build Employee Trust and Commitment

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There have been myriads of articles and posts written about how leaders can best build commitment and a culture of trust among their employees. Many of those methods are proven and well-studied.

But one thing often missed is a need for leaders to drive deeper into themselves and promote a behavioral leadership style that fosters connection, commitment, and engagement.

Below are 6 behavior mindset changes that leaders need to change within themselves before they change the level of trust in their organization.

  • Trust Your People First. I had a business owner who was severely challenged with staffing tell me the reason she couldn’t get employees was that she didn’t trust anyone. She was shocked when I told her she was correct and wrong at the same time. Numbers of studies show how employees want trust from their leaders. Placing the trust in your people first will usually work to get them engaged – it never happens the other way around.
  • Don’t Play Favorites. Leaders who ignore others, such as spending most of their time with the coolest or the people making the numbers happen, divide their teams silently and quickly. When people feel detached because they aren’t part of the “inner circle” they distrust leadership and many think you have to be unethical in order to get attention or feel valued.
  • Don’t Assume Fault. Over the years I worked for a leader whose favorite response to any situation was “Who’s fault is that?” A question like this always placed people on the defensive, and assumed a failure on that person’s behalf. Moving away from a fault-finding mindset into a mindset of turning bad circumstances into opportunities to win long-term, change processes, or develop skills will have your people fighting for you when things go bad, instead of fleeing from you.
  • Know That They May Know More Than You. I had a former colleague say that they had been embarrassed about a boss showing them up by stating how little my friend knew in front of others and proceeded to talk about something they did not really know much about. My colleague told me the boss was actually the one who embarrassed themselves because everyone present saw the puffed-up leader make a fool of themselves. It did more to harm the trust of the staff as they felt they too would be next on the public embarrassment stage. Give your people the platform to showcase what they know and then stay out of their way to prove it.
  • Don’t Assume Ill Intent. Many times when an employee has an issue the first thing certain leaders do is to assume that the person isn’t committed, or going rogue, or being a saboteur. When leaders know that performance issues usually stem from lack of trust in leadership, systems, or culture, then you can take steps to correct those external forces that negatively impact employee performance. It’s another aspect of trust that needs to be present in mind at all times.
  • Find Ways To Always Train Them Up. Whether subtly or overtly, leaders who tear down staff in front of others will not produce leaders or employees who do the same in others. When a great leader focuses on every opportunity to train and develop, consistent with the other behaviors listed, a culture of trust is solidified in which true business growth can then foster. By finding ways to train instead of criticize, people around you will adopt a development mindset that attracts employees and brings out their best for you.

Over the years I have noticed that the best leaders consistently exhibit all of these traits without wavering. Those that have swung on both ends of the spectrum in any of these behaviors showed a much higher degree of employee mistrust.

Changing the level of commitment from employees means changing the level of trust first. This can only be done by changing your leadership mindset in how you approach and view any and all of your people to begin with.

(image: pixabay)

About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on September.16.2018, in Character-based Leadership, Connection & Engagement, Culture, Leadership, Leadership Development, Leadership Strategies, Visionary Leadership. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I like how your examples and they make great sense!

    As a sales manager, when applying the 80/20 rule and spending more time with a certain group of people (the top performers) from my experiences, I have actually had great results. Here’s why:

    – The top performers (in a sales environment in this case) are usually motivated by external factors such as being praised publicly, developing connections with management (they are frequently identified for growth opportunities), etc.

    – Non- performers are aware that more attention is being given to the top performers and they work harder to try become a performer, too. In these cases, it’s imperative to acknowledge their efforts and growth and before you know it, your top performers’ numbers have grown.

    – People like things that are sought after and this acts as a motivator and results in increased productivity

    I believe that if an environment is principle based and these principles are well known by all, as long as the leader bases their decisions and actions on them, there is only trust to be gained through consistency and predictability!
    Xx

    Themissdru
    https://team-guide.com/

    Like

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