Is Your Employee Appreciation Week “Weak”?

334H

It’s a wonderful privilege to honor your people through the various Employee Appreciation Days and Weeks.

Whether it’s Nurses Appreciation Week, Administrative Professionals Day, Maintenance Appreciation Week, Customer Service Appreciation Week or any of the other recognized weeks, they give a tremendous opportunity to deepen the level of engagement in your organization.

And yet many, many organizations, and particularly the leaders of those teams or organizations, display a shameful treatment of their employees that reveal to all of their people how they truly value them. 

Consider some of these actual examples that leaders executed to show “appreciation” for their people:

  • Ice cream sandwiches. (Yes, that was it! That was all they received!)
  • Spotify gift cards – for new accounts only. Most of the employees had existing or shared accounts and ended up re-gifting these.
  • The Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts gift card with just enough on it for a free coffee, not even a Venti or a Latte. (This happens more often that you realize)
  • Leftover food from first and second shifts. (We appreciate the people on third shift but don’t want to stay up late to make that extra effort for them)
  • Company t-shirts, mugs or anything else that praises the company and not the employee.
  • Cheap nail clippers, name badge holders, pens, hats that no one will wear, and so on (you get the picture)
  • Holiday hams, but nothing for vegetarian employees
  • Letting budget be an excuse for not doing anything special (“That’s all we have budgeted for the week”)

These very examples (and many, many more) are just some of the reasons why employee engagement scores low in most organizations.

Great leaders know that while appreciating your team is an every day, purposeful event, when it’s time to focus such as the various appreciation weeks, going above and beyond will go a long way in keeping your culture intact.

If you want to make your people truly feel APPRECIATED keep these following principles in mind:

  • So something different each day and every day throughout the week. Food one day, cards the next, auction off some gifts another day … be creative. Mix it up day to day and year to year.
  • Have all the leaders spend whatever time is needed to execute and host and serve. (One year our leadership team spend all night making truffles and bagging them for the staff)
  • Be available at all times to personally serve and thank your people. If that means giving up sleep for 3rd shift employees, or coming in on weekends and nights, then that is what you need to do. Nothing is more impressive than when a staff member sees their leader traveling to the remote facility, showing up at 1:00am, or hopping in their truck or loading dock to meet them personally.
  • Don’t make a fool of yourself. Long speeches, drinking, or being inappropriate with your humor will do more harm than good.
  • Careful of making recognition fun that doesn’t connect. Watch your people for their reaction and change course as needed. Get employee feedback throughout the year for what they want.
  • Know your audience. If you give gifts that no one wants or can use (such as the holiday ham to the vegetarian), or show appreciation that misses the mark (such as humor or fun events that people think are boring or in poor taste, this can backfire on you. Study and know your people throughout the year to find what the culture of the team will appreciate.
  • Be there. Don’t schedule vacations, seminars, or board meetings during this time. They want to see you. If at all possible ride with them, work alongside them, or find a means to connect during their work week to understand them better as not just employees but as PEOPLE.
  • Spare no expense. That doesn’t mean to be unwise in your stewardship of company finances, but to be cheap (or frugal or however you justify it) will only make the employees feel cheap and undervalued. So many companies skimp on training and other initiatives for their people, that you will make a huge impact in letting them know the company and its leaders spent decent money on them.

Engagement and retaining talent starts with appreciation. Not only during a given week, but in every day, make your people know that they are appreciated in the way that THEY, not you, want.

(image: gratisography)

Advertisements

About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on May.13.2018, in Character-based Leadership, Connection & Engagement, Core Values, Culture, Leadership, Leadership Strategies, Team Development. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: