The Perils Of Chasing Rabbits

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Does your company go chasing rabbits every now and then?

Chasing rabbits is when any thought or action disrupts what is relevant and takes people off tangent of the current course.

For example, an email can cause a ripple effect through a department when people jump to conclusions or immediately respond to the “urgency” of the subject or discussion, causing people minutes to hours of disrupted work.

 

When a company chases a rabbit without intent, such as the above example, it can create unintended consequences in stopping the flow of work. But if done intentionally, it has far more damaging effects.

I was involved in the leadership team of an organization that met weekly. The chief executive would strategically take a conversation off course by throwing out a thought that the rest of the team would pounce on and discuss quite fervently. We soon discovered that when certain issues were brought up that could shed light on some of their improprieties, they would throw us off and down a rabbit trail in hopes that we’d get distracted. It worked for a time but when it finally caught up to them, we had gone far off our mission and realized the wasted time and resources that were affected by their behavior.

It’s easy to go down a rabbit trail – knee-jerk responses, emotional ploys, fear, anger, bringing others in that bog down the disruption, and playing off assumptions and urgencies that don’t exist.

 

In order to prevent your team from going down the rabbit trail, ensure your team:

A team that has enough people that is grounded in the main tenets of their culture will protect themselves from both intentional and unintentional rabbit trails that come their way.

(image: flickr)

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About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on May.6.2018, in Character-based Leadership, Culture, Leadership, Leadership Strategies, Organizational Development, Values, Visionary Leadership. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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