Even A Little Customer Experience Will Crush It

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I made a quick trip into a well-known retailer this week and was appalled at what transpired immediately when I entered.

One manager, walking towards me, looked right at me and kept walking. A second manager, just past this first, looked at me as I made eye contact with him, stared at me for about 2 seconds, then promptly turned and walked away.

No greeting. No “Hello, Welcome to…”. No focus on the customer experience at all.

If one of their competitors, small business or large, decided to up their game and greet their customers at the door and ensure even a small level of engagement throughout the store, they would put this established location out of business.

Customers want to feel acknowledged. It’s the basic tenet in many studies of behavior. Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs addresses this in both the Belonging and Esteem levels. Hyrum Smith, of Franklin Planner fame, expresses this in the Needs Wheel of The Reality Model.

And yet many many leaders fail to model this basic behavior.

That’s why even a little focus on the customer experience will enable an organization to crush it and create raving fans.

When the focus is on either the bottom line, getting the job done, or surviving through the day, your customers feel it and are likewise impacted. Even elderly people with dementia or diminished senses in a nursing home sense when they are treated poorly or ignored.

Making your customers and those you cater to feel engaged always makes the difference.

If you want your leadership and your organization to stand out, and to crush it in a day where customer experience is largely lacking, then make them feel special and create even the smallest of differences in their experience.

Because that’s what you want when you are a customer. It’s one of our basic needs.

(image: laomao)

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About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on April.22.2018, in Connection & Engagement, Culture, Customer Experience, Customer Service, Leadership, Leadership Strategies. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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