How To Develop A Broader Hiring Search

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Many of us understand that the job market is a tough, competitive one. In the pursuit for good talent, it’s necessary to stand out in order to attract solid candidates.

However, if you look closely at your hiring criteria, you may find that you’ve set too stringent a criteria for your search and restricting or excluding the people who may be the best match for your organization.

Look at your hiring and job descriptions then see if any of these key phrases appear:

  • XX years of YY industry experience
  • XX years of <specific> regional management preferred
  • Knowledge of Excel, Powerpoint, Word
  • Experience using ZZ system (usually a CRM, SaaS, other technical interfaces)
  • XX years working for AA or BB company/or in AA or BB operations/systems
  • Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s preferred
  • Extensive contacts and network in the industry

Now at first glance these seem like necessary skills that a candidate needs to possess. But dive a little deeper and ask a few questions respectively:

  • Industry experience – Can someone from an ancillary industry serve in the same capacity with the same impact?
  • Regional management – Does someone who is highly effective managing a team of 5 qualify them for managing a team of 50?
  • Excel, PPT, Word – Do these still matter today? Do these need to be mentioned?
  • Using a system – can someone who is competent learn your system?
  • Working for a specific company – Does this shows preference and bias to an internal candidate? Or, can someone learn internal operations quickly and still effect needed change?
  • Degree required, preferred – If the right candidate emerges without this, will you disqualify them?
  • Contacts in the industry – Does this “rainmaker” bring the right customers into the pipeline? Do you show a red flag for not generating leads or other internal warning signs?

The core question at the root of all of these is this:

Are you being too stringent in your own prejudices and hiring biases that you’re neglecting great talent?

I’ve worked with many companies and managers who let sharp talent slip past them because they carved out and restricted otherwise matching talent because they didn’t fit a certain pre-conceived mold.

In fact, I had one manager say she wasn’t going to hire a customer service person because there was a spelling error on her application!!

Yes, certain non-negotiable traits must be met. But how many do we place in our hiring process, and particular our ATS, that are kicked out because they aren’t – in what we and/or the ATS deem – the “right fit”.

Most hiring is like an iceberg. That top 10% is skill and the below the surface is the 90% behaviors that you can’t see at first. You only see the top 10% of what the person shows and neglect the 90% of who they are. And our hiring processes only are targeted for that 10% and leave the other 90% untouched. It’s that 90% that can tell you more accurately what a candidate brings to the table.

A former colleague of mine was refused an interview as he was told he didn’t have the needed experience. When they called him on the phone to inform him, he went down the job description and asked them line by line what the’re looking for, then matched it up with what his style and behaviors have accomplished. After each line, they admitted that he did have the relevant talent they were looking for. They scheduled an interview and he got the position after all.

Whether you’re looking at internal or external candidates, don’t restrict your chances to finding the right fit by narrowing your search. Have high standards, but open up the parameters to capture as many people as you can in the queue. Then you can use your standards to select the best from among them.

(image: pixaby)

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About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on February.25.2018, in Connection & Engagement, Culture, Leadership, Leadership Strategies, Talent, Team Development. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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