Winning Teammates (And Leaders) Encourage Others

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If you were to ask yourself “Who was the best teammate in your life?” what would be the qualifiers taken into consideration? That is the key question throughout Sean Glaze’s new book “The 10 Commandments of Winning Teammates“.

Sean’s years of coaching experience allowed him to see the most effective ways organizations build winning teams. He has boiled down the essential qualities into a great story in this book. One of the key concepts is in the chapter entitled “Be Aware Of and Encourage Others”.

In this portion of the story, the main character Nick notices how a team is encouraging each other constantly throughout their work shift. When Nick comments to the employee, he is informed that this culture also infuses encouragement in constant reminders to do their best in what lies ahead for them.

This concept is the opposite of the tendency for “rear-view criticisms” in which teammates criticize why a particular task wasn’t done or completed a certain way. Instead of focusing on the past issues, the team culture focuses on what lies ahead and builds others up with these friendly reminders to ensure great execution.

The proven method behind this is to genuinely help your fellow co-workers prevent mistakes and encourage them to succeed. It is a proven method on sports teams and works well in business whether hospitality, factory, or professional.

This is just one of the great principles that Sean outlines in this book. As you read it, you will learn powerful and simply effective ways to incorporate them not only in business, but your own personal life as well.

Get your copy of “The 10 Commandments of Winning Teammates” at Amazon or on Sean’s website and propel your team to new heights!

(image: http://unbouncepages.com/winning-teammates/)

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About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on August.21.2016, in Book Review, Character-based Leadership, Connection & Engagement, Culture, People Development, Personal Development. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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