One Key Thought To Hiring

hiring line

I spent the morning with a hospital account of mine earlier this week. My key contact there, David, is a great addition to their food-service and nutrition team, and I have thoroughly enjoyed both his attitude and his knowledge since he has come aboard in recent months.

When I was leaving, I ran into his boss, Colleen, on the way out. As we caught up on some quick developments, I asked her how everything was going with David. She just beamed with excitement and talked about how much of a positive impact he has made to the facility.

Colleen recalled one instance in the first two weeks in which David volunteered to come in on a Sunday morning at 5:30am to help the staff cover a shift. This sent a great message to the staff that David was willing step in and help them out and work alongside them.

When I asked Colleen how she felt about bringing David aboard, she said “You know, it took me many months of not hiring just anybody to find the right person.” It was a great statement that reminded me of what an old boss told me in my early days of leadership “Sometimes it’s best to be short on the team than to hire the wrong person.”

A savvy leader knows the importance of hiring the right combination of skills and attitudes. They can find the proper compliment to their staff and tap into the more talented people in the industry.

But if that leader is not willing to wait for the right person to groom or hire in, they may find themselves in a far worse position than just having that slot vacant. While they actively search and qualify the prospective candidates, they don’t rush to fill until they have found the best person.

Wise leaders go beyond the skill, behavior, and attitude sets of their candidates. They qualify and are patient until the best one appears.

(image: asiabizz.com)

 

 

 

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About Paul LaRue

My goal - To encourage you to lead & influence others with positive impact.

Posted on September.16.2014, in Culture, Leadership, Leadership Development, Leadership Strategies, Organizational Development, Training. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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