6 Uncommon Ways Leaders Need To Build Employee Trust and Commitment

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There have been myriads of articles and posts written about how leaders can best build commitment and a culture of trust among their employees. Many of those methods are proven and well-studied.

But one thing often missed is a need for leaders to drive deeper into themselves and promote a behavioral leadership style that fosters connection, commitment, and engagement.

Below are 6 behavior mindset changes that leaders need to change within themselves before they change the level of trust in their organization.

  • Trust Your People First. I had a business owner who was severely challenged with staffing tell me the reason she couldn’t get employees was that she didn’t trust anyone. She was shocked when I told her she was correct and wrong at the same time. Numbers of studies show how employees want trust from their leaders. Placing the trust in your people first will usually work to get them engaged – it never happens the other way around.
  • Don’t Play Favorites. Leaders who ignore others, such as spending most of their time with the coolest or the people making the numbers happen, divide their teams silently and quickly. When people feel detached because they aren’t part of the “inner circle” they distrust leadership and many think you have to be unethical in order to get attention or feel valued.
  • Don’t Assume Fault. Over the years I worked for a leader whose favorite response to any situation was “Who’s fault is that?” A question like this always placed people on the defensive, and assumed a failure on that person’s behalf. Moving away from a fault-finding mindset into a mindset of turning bad circumstances into opportunities to win long-term, change processes, or develop skills will have your people fighting for you when things go bad, instead of fleeing from you.
  • Know That They May Know More Than You. I had a former colleague say that they had been embarrassed about a boss showing them up by stating how little my friend knew in front of others and proceeded to talk about something they did not really know much about. My colleague told me the boss was actually the one who embarrassed themselves because everyone present saw the puffed-up leader make a fool of themselves. It did more to harm the trust of the staff as they felt they too would be next on the public embarrassment stage. Give your people the platform to showcase what they know and then stay out of their way to prove it.
  • Don’t Assume Ill Intent. Many times when an employee has an issue the first thing certain leaders do is to assume that the person isn’t committed, or going rogue, or being a saboteur. When leaders know that performance issues usually stem from lack of trust in leadership, systems, or culture, then you can take steps to correct those external forces that negatively impact employee performance. It’s another aspect of trust that needs to be present in mind at all times.
  • Find Ways To Always Train Them Up. Whether subtly or overtly, leaders who tear down staff in front of others will not produce leaders or employees who do the same in others. When a great leader focuses on every opportunity to train and develop, consistent with the other behaviors listed, a culture of trust is solidified in which true business growth can then foster. By finding ways to train instead of criticize, people around you will adopt a development mindset that attracts employees and brings out their best for you.

Over the years I have noticed that the best leaders consistently exhibit all of these traits without wavering. Those that have swung on both ends of the spectrum in any of these behaviors showed a much higher degree of employee mistrust.

Changing the level of commitment from employees means changing the level of trust first. This can only be done by changing your leadership mindset in how you approach and view any and all of your people to begin with.

(image: pixabay)

6 Leader Styles That Personify Servant Leadership

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Look at the list of professional roles below and see if you can find a leadership trait that each has in common with the rest:

  • Circus Ringmaster
  • Symphony Conductor
  • School Teacher
  • Healthcare Professional (Nurse, Doctor, Specialist, Weight Loss Coach)
  • Pastor
  • Law Officer

What these roles have in common is their sole purpose is to bring out the best in those they interface with, without glory for themselves. This commonality is the core of their leadership, and anyone else’s as well.

Each of these roles function is to make those around them better, while working hard to perfect their calling. They may be the focal point at first glance, but careful discernment shows the prefer others to be focused on instead.

Let’s look quickly at how each one does this and what we can learn from their approach.

Circus Ringmaster. You may think this person is the center stage attraction. Every act they have the spotlight, and their showmanship and persona gain the attention of everyone in the audience. But their core job is to build up excitement and anticipation for the main acts and to slip behind the curtain away from the spotlight to allow the performers to showcase their talents. Great leaders promote their people and never stand in the way of their ability to “Wow” their customers.

Symphony Conductor.  It takes years of study to attain to this level of musical mastery, yet the conductor is only 1 of 50, 100 or more people working together. They may be a headliner to a degree (such as Arthur Fiedler) but usually perform with their back towards their audience, having the musicians face the crowd. Their job is to get the best performance of each musician, each section, and create a culture of teamwork and professionalism to give a peak performance, over and over, each night.

School Teacher. To have the power to effect young and impressionable minds of the future should not be a task taken lightly. Teachers are charged with creating foundations for academics, model citizens, and fostering behaviors to mold the next generation of (all-too-soon-to-be) adults. To balance teaching core principles, truth, critical thinking, and mutual respect as well as keeping their students engaged and motivated daily are similar to what many leaders face every day. That all with the focus of getting children to learn and believe in their talents as they are just starting to discover them.

Healthcare Professional. The roles of these women and men may work more on the physical needs, but they work on the mental and emotional needs of those that depend on them. Their goal is a simple one – to make people better, healthier – by their skills and also through education, compassion, and sacrificing themselves. Many of these women and men work long hours to save a life, often putting themselves at risk. A great leader serves others in spite of the inherent danger they may face themselves, without recognition many times. (When a patient heals, it’s almost always said they made a great recovery and rarely does the credit go the to nurse or doctor).

Pastor. A pastor’s true calling is not to build a big mega-church, write best sellers, make people feel better, or have a large video audience. Theirs is a simple yet difficult calling – to faithfully teach the Scriptures to their congregation and help them towards spiritual maturity. Handled properly they can help positively impact many lives; but an incorrect misuse of the text or their office can leave lives, families, and whole communities in shambles. Pastors devote themselves to careful study, long hours, of prayer and ministry, and forego the comforts of their home lifestyle to meet the needs of others in their homes, the hospital, or wherever the need occurs. They grieve when people falter, and are patient and long-suffering to see folks grow slowly over years and decades. They are the true servant leaders who serve others to help them grow spiritually.

Law Officer. While this role may seem out of sorts juxtaposed on this list, their position is a unique one, especially those with integrity. They swear an oath to protect and to serve others, through both enforcing the law and keeping the order and safety of the citizens in their city or town. They serve through all elements (no bad weather days) and oftentimes volunteer to put their bodies and lives at risk to ensure the welfare of others. They personify servant leadership by placing their own well being to the limits in order to ensure citizens have freedom and peace form those who oppose it.

Virtually all of these servant leader roles are thankless jobs; others get the attention and recognition when things go right, and they take all of the blame when things go wrong. Yet true servant leadership is not worried about where the credit goes, they simply want others to do better as a result of their talents and skills and position.

Consider how your own role can model a better servant leader influence. Take some guidance from these noble positions and incorporate their passion into serving others.

(image: pixaby)

How Organizations Need To Confirm Humanity

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Have you ever had to click on the above image? You know, those automated boxes that prevent “bots” from spamming their site whenever you make a purchase, download a file, or subscribe to their email newsletter.

It helps to allow the digital experience to qualify better organization-to-consumer relationships and minimize organization-to-automation drain on their resources.

This “Confirm Humanity” process is quite necessary today, but what is more necessary in today’s world is the need to actually confirm humanity when it comes to customer service in the digital realm.

A recent study on customer service showed that it is the new battlefield of differentiation for marketing, yet it will be spread across multiple platforms to reach customers. The challenge with the multi-channel service is that between online, mobile and social media portals is that there is huge challenge to confirm humanity at every interaction.

It’s not enough to deliver a digital experience across several channels but to ensure that each customer feels there is both a human experience and human connection.

The anti-bot checkbox helps confirm humanity to the company, but how is your company confirming humanity to your customers?

Just because a channel is hosted online does not mean there cannot be a human experience behind it. Many ways to confirm humanity exist on those digital channels such as:

  • Video introduction, interaction, of confirmation of subscription or purchase
  • Having an intuitive design for customer experience
  • Creating a Zappos-like instant chat or call center culture
  • Showing politeness and thankfulness on confirmation screens, pop-ups, and weekly newsletters (versus the standard “Thank you for your order.”
  • Ensure the end-user experience is smooth, intuitive, stable and built with the customer, not the company, foremost in mind
  • Use psychology and behavior patterns to be more intune to your customers tendencies, needs and expectations
  • Personalize their service using smart AI and allow the customer to personalize their experience as well
  • Humanize your brand image – even the most tech and industrial companies do this such as Rackspace
  • Get your customers to be engaged through your channels, whether building raving fans or deeper community online

There are myriads of ways to confirm the humanity of your company to your customers. While customers continue to gravitate to online channels, they are still people who want to be valued as people on the other end of the transaction. making your digital experience a great customer experience by infusing more humanity will determine your success in this area.

Oh, and one more very important thing. Make sure everyone in your organization confirms humanity by displaying care and great service attitudes as well. Most companies are still sorely lacking in this area. No matter how many multi-channel services you offer, the interpersonal customer experience is always about people, and starts and stops here.

 

 

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